The Moisture Probe Ends Here

Here is the location site #1: The Meadow. In the photo you can see the implanted probe. Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

Here is the location site #1: The Meadow. In the photo you can see the implanted probe.
Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

This project has been very educational and very helpful to me. I feel like I have learned so much and I feel like a professional when it comes to taking soil moisture samples. I know that taking measurements/samples isn’t a hard task at all, since all you have to do is choose a location, place the probe into the ground about 6″, and then press the “Test” button. Anyone can do this task, it is a bit messy but it is lots of fun. 

In this project I took the Soil Moisture measurement/sample of various locations within a one-fourth mile radius of one another on my school campus. I have collected of that data and I compiled it all into a data table, which you can if you scroll down. Also, along the left hand side of this blog are pictures of the various locations.

 

 


As you can see here, this is a close-up picture of the display screen of the Aquateer Model 200.

As you can see here, this is a close-up picture of the display screen of the Aquateer Model 200.

 

The Soil Moisture Meter measures the wetness or dryness of soil. When I first go the Soil Probe it was already calibrated for me. As I researched more and more about this specific probe I learned the basis of how to use it effectively. First, you need to calibrate it properly. To do that you place the bottom end of the probe into a pitcher of water. Then press the “Test” button, it should read ‘100.’ If it does not read that then you use the left knob to correct it. By turning the knob clockwise, it will increase the reading and by turning counter-clockwise, it will decrease the reading. Just continue to turn the knob either way in order for it to read ‘100.’ After the process, you are free to take samples of soil of anywhere.

Here is the location site #2: The grass area near the Natatorium. Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez.

Here is the location site #2: The grass area near the meadow.
Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez.

Here is the location site #3: Grass field by the natatorium. Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

Here is the location site #3: Grass field by the natatorium.
Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

Here is the location site #4: Under the Pine Trees. Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

Here is the location site #4: Under the Pine Trees.
Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

Here is the final location, site #5: The Orchard field. Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

Here is the final location, site #5: The Orchard field.
Photo: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez

 

You know you have done so much research on Soil Moisture Probes when you receive an ad on it on Pandora.  Screenshot: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez. http://www.pandora.com/station/play/2651033874586953623

You know you have done so much research on Soil Moisture Probes when you receive an ad on it on Pandora.
Screenshot: Courtesy of Jordan Melendez.
http://www.pandora.com/station/play/265103387458695362

Location May 12th,2015.2:05 p.m – 2:15 p.m May 13th,2015.2:05pm -2:15 p.m(Rained the night before) May 14th,2015.10:30 a.m – 10:40 a.m May15th,2015.2:05 p.m – 2:15 p.m
1. Meadow The soil is 72% Wet The soil is 80% Wet The soil is 62% Wet The soil is 51% Wet
2.Grassy Area by the plot of the Meadow The soil is 19% Wet The soil is 14% Wet The soil is 37% Wet The soil is 23% Wet
3..Grass near the Natatorium The soil is 36% Wet The soil is 51% Wet The soil is 59% Wet The soil is 16% Wet
4.Under the Pine Trees The soil is 36% Wet The soil is 63% Wet The soil is 14% Wet The soil is 23% Wet
5.Orchard The soil is 67% Wet The soil is 44% Wet The soil is 34% Wet The soil is 45% Wet

 Reference
http://www.vegetronix.com/TechInfo/Soil-Moisture-Sensor-Comparison.phtml
http://www.aquaterr.net/history-of-company.html
http://www.aquaterr.net/PDF/User’s%20Manual%20Probes%202013.pdf

 

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